About your Search

20130416
20130424
SHOW
Cavuto 12
Journal 11
( more )
STATION
CNNW 64
FBC 64
CSPAN 50
KQED (PBS) 36
CNBC 35
CSPAN2 29
MSNBCW 25
KRCB (PBS) 19
KGO (ABC) 16
KNTV (NBC) 14
KPIX (CBS) 14
KCSM (PBS) 10
CNN 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 496
Search Results 55 to 154 of about 507 (some duplicates have been removed)
: seasonally strong time of year for home sales. overall, the u.s. economy is running below its historical trend. this is a study done by the index. my next guest says the economy sluggish growth may be the most ideal condition for investors. joining us is now jack. welcome to you. >> thank you, lori. lori: you see this as a prime opportunity. some new investment dollars could go into the stock market. >> yes, potentially. fair value in the market is probably about 1520. we are slightly ahead of that. we have a lot of favorable factors. one, keep money. we have stocks that look cheap. if we can get confidence, you know, of investors, but also builds confidence picking up, i think you could see treasurers and armature treasurers start to exploit that difference. as long as the fed keeps the backdrop in place, then the market can go higher. we do not want to fall into a double dip type of scenario. on the other hand, we do not want anything too strong to suggest that perhaps the fed will take its foot off the accelerator. lori: if you have new money to invest, what type of stocks would you p
reporting exceeded estimations. it is an indication of -- of -- of a stronger economy. if somebody told me we would have a 5% correction i would say look at that as an opportunity to get into the market. >> which is basically what you just said, jonathan, right? >> yeah, i do think larry is perhaps a lit totle too optimis. cull pans are beating the quarter and missing revenue estimates. if you take out financials because of special, some things are specific to their sector, you really are seeing negative earnings growth not compared to prior quarter but a year ago. things are weak. domestic companies doing much better than companies with big global footprints. >> what are you expecting from the week ahead? more heavy earnings numbers coming out. brig group of companies. and the gdp end of the week. >> i think actually for the reason. a lot more chop in the market. a lot of two way action. company specific. i think we have to get a little bit of clarity on whether companies feel this is just a little rough patch. we are going to pick up on the back end. there is an interesting wrinkle below
, weekly jobless claims of. the market down. four out of the five past days. the state of the economy next. alec, for this mission i upgraded your smart phone. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earn witmy ventu car sauce to erase recent tvel purchases. d with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪ you requested backup? yes. yes i did. what's in your wallet? could lose tens of thousands of dollars on their 401(k) to hidden fees. thafully e-trade has low cost investments and no hidden fees. but, you know, if you're still bent on blowing this fat stack of cash, there's a couple of ways you could do it. ♪ ♪ or just go to e-trade and save it. boom. ♪ ♪ lou: optimism about economic growth commissioning -- diminishing as markets posted sharp losses for a third day this week. talk about the short-term. joining me now with his outlook for the economy, former bp, the president and ceo of the cake schiller institute. good to have you with us. >> goo
, weekly jobless claims of. the market down. four out of the five past days. the state ofhe economy next. the boys used double miles from their capital one venture card to fly home for the big family reunion. you must be garth's father? hello. mother. mother! traveling is easy with the venture card because you cafly airline anytime. two words. double miles! this guy can act. wanna play dodge rock? oh, you guys! and with double miles you can actuay use, ou never miss the fun. beard growi conte and go! ♪ win! what's in your wallet? ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions.. in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. ♪ lou: optimism about economic growth commissioning -- diminishing as markets posted shar losses for a third day this week. talk about the short-term. joining me now with his outlook for the economy
have had a broken system. it has been a drag on our economy. mr. holtz-eakin, thank you for your testimony. it will help minnesota businesses and families alike. i want to think the senators who ever done this, getting us as far as we have gotten. mr. holtz-eakin, one of the most things i have most pleased about is what it does for agriculture, particularly in minnesota. minnesota is one of the biggest dairy producers in our nation. dairy farmers have not been able to access the work force they have needed for years. one program that allows farmers to get guest workers is open only to seasonal workers, and you cannot milk cows seasonally. you could, but you would get very uncomfortable cows. i have been calling for this -- anyway. enough said. >> i used to be chairman of the senate agriculture committee. you are bringing back to my roots. >> vermont has a very great dairy-producing culture. i'm glad the gang of eight felt the same way. we have heard testimony on the issue of productivity. it seems having access to a dependable legal work force has got to be a boom for various par
market since the start of this cycle. weakness in oil could portend investors worries that the economies are slowing down not just in china but globally as well. so that will probably put pressure on the market. the other thing too, we're in the earnings season and this might be the quarter that doesn't delight. that is that we do get some dispoints manned -- disappointments and we get stiff reactions to the disappointments. lori: bob, you were cautious yet looking for stocks to show gains for the year. what do you think will get us past these bumps in the road? >> i think the bumps in the road should not be unexpected. the market is up 20% since last june. so it is not unusual to have a five to 7% correction at this stage. following on gene's comments, we are in earnings season. interesting when you look this year, i think that will be stimulus for further correction. expectations are 5% increase over last year for this quarter. 7% for the second quarter. 18% for the third quarter and 28 for the fourth. i think as companies report, analysts will be really focused on what the guidance be
and perhaps boosting our economy if we can't be sure who to let in? with me now are american enterprise scholar maaed din, we also have economist extraordinaire, professor peter morici. thanks for joining us. madeine, let me start with you. as we said, as we look at this immigration bill, you can immediately feel a reaction coming out of what happened with boston. to slow down on anything that we might be doing including student visas, including asylum, including some of the workers that we would need especially in the area of student visas who might graduate and then be productive in their economy. what are your thoughts on this? >> well, melissa, that's a great question, and thanks for having here to talk about this. the immigration bill that's before the senate right now, it's a great piece of legislation. and it would have no bearing whatsoever on the vy tragic events that happened in boston. the reality is that people who are here, unfortunately, be they native or immigrant, sometimes you commit horrific acts. but we don't base immigration policy on that. we should base it on our e
korea says they will inject more than 15 billion into the economy. says it willorea inject more than 15 billion into the economy. the money will be used to create jobs, build the stagnant real estate market and cover a tax revenue shortfall. pakistan's former president will not be allowed to run for the national assembly in upcoming elections. he had been cleared to campaign for northern pakistan but now being disqualified. he has been barred from running four l fou -- in all constituencies he applied for. a new session of parliament in kenya. the arrival one in a closely- contested vote last month. we're joined from our reporter in niobe -- nairobi. >> we are just outside the parliament now. we are expecting the president to arrive very soon. he will inspect the guards and enter the parliament behind me, and he will give his speech to what is the 11th parliament here in kenya. now, in his inauguration speech he really tried to ignite the country behind him. formillion people voted him. there have been meetings between the men at the state house here to try to reconcile these different
important than ref knew. i know the economy is soft. therefore revenues is soft. why aren't earnings much more important? why is wall street so obsessed with the revenues? >> the good news, larry, is that even though they talk about the revenue a lot and complain a lot about the revenues, the stock market -- we hit all-time highs this year, and we're up basically for four years in a row now, and that tells me that underneath all of this complaining and fear profits really do matter, and if you look at after hours tonight, i mean, who knows what will happen tomorrow, but the companies that beat on the profits are on the upside tonight in after-hours trading. >> profits are the mother's milk of stocks, i've said it before and revenues are not the mer's milk of stocks. profits are. >> that's absolutely true. isn't it also true, brian, that when you look at fact that in general earnings are coming in pretty good for a large number of companies, we still look at -- look like the best looking girl at the dance, especially when you compare us to other part of the world like europe? >> that's abs
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings withi
teach japan economy at georgetown. you're making the summit interesting again. the interesting problems that you face, and i d not envy you, is you said the fits call consolidation, the consumption tax will go up next year and the following year, and you're certainly aware that will take a big hit on consumption on income that will have a negative impact on the economy, and i'm wondering how you're balancing these two different issues of fiscal consolidation and demand. [speaking japanese] >> translator: i think you have hit on the most important point, because whenever we may try to increase the taxes, it does not necessarily result in increasing the tax revenue. we have known the actual examples which have happened in the past in many nrsakg ne >> you can watch the rest of this online as we take you live now to the heritage foundation in washington, d.c. for remarks by senator mike lee of utah. he'll be talking about the conservative movement and the future of the republican party. >> in his most recent book, "we still hold these truths: rediscovering our principles, reclaiming our fu
economy still in front of us that we need solutions for. and i think the women can very much be part of that debate in bringing it forward. >> i've always been struck by the fact that even when there weren't 20, that the women senators have always bonded across party lines. and across ideological lines. i know that lisa murkowsky's vote against gun background checks was a big disappointment to many of you and she was supposed to be the host of tonight's get-together until it was moved to the white house. and heidi heitkamp, how difficult might that conversation with with the white house. we told that the white house was very angry with her to have voted against the background checks. >> you know, andrea, both heidi heitkamp and lisa murkowsky voted for the gun trafficking bill. there was a measure that they were willing to support to end gun trafficking, straw purchasing, pro enforcement measures. so i think there's bipartisan support for these bills, i think we can find consensus going forward and we have to work a little harder. i find the women to be very open to these issues and
, but until the economy improves they're the not going to get out of the way and i think because of that, this market will go up and more talk about that this week. >> we're only what, a couple-- we were down on the week about a couple hundred points, that's not a major selloff by any means. larry, thanks indeed. you're saying the market is trying to go up, we shall see. we have a news background, not yet occurred, at ten o'clock, half hour from now we're going to get the existing home sales, a very big pointing that is supposedly improving housing market. you'll get the numbers as we them, too. i want to warn you, coming up on friday, the latest gdp numbers, they're going to be inflated and show a rate of growth maybe 3%, very strong. but, there's a new calculation involved. so watch out there. the dow is now open for business. we're up 5 in the very early going, yeah, the up trend in place, first thing this monday morning. and why are we going to show you the price of a foreign corporation? why are we doing that? i'll tell you because the japanese stocks are going straight up as the ye
were worried already about the underlying fundmentals of the economy and market. what did you mean by that? >> separating the two, the economy and the markets are kind of acting like on one side slow growth particularly on the revenue side world wide including china and we understand the dependence on what is happening with the feppeds -- feds with the zero cost of money . on the other hand, we have an issue of people looking for a safe haven. united states is probably the safest democratic country right now and a growing acceptance that interest rates will go up. particularly in 2014 . they are rotating on the bond and going into the equitty conflict. you have a good news/bad news kind of thing. that supported the market in the end of the day. so much money is looking for a home. on the other hand, there is a rude awakening before it is all over. >> you know when you look at the market in general and what is an aggressive run up look at the past week, i guess it shouldn't surprise you. i do i want want to overly bore the viewers and over do it. but the sectors most impacted were h
worried about china especially about the economy after the lower than expected growth numbers that we saw this week. and he addressed that. he was talking a bit about the concerns about rising debt levels and he played those down. he played down the weaker growth. >> i don't think people should panic about chinese economy will continue to grow at the sustainable level. the government's target could be fulfilled without much difficulty and we aim at the quality of the growth. i don't think achieving 7, 7.5% is a big deal for china. i don't think so. >> the fund invests heavily in resources. i couldn't help myself from asking him specifically about gold. he believes the sudden drop in gold is general instability in the global economy. he hopes it comes back at some point soon. >> thank you very much. we were watching that and that's the perfect segue. we've been watching what's happening and it's important to see what the chinese think about this and no better person than cic chairman. we'll talk about gold and what's been happening not only with gold but also oil prices after yesterday slu
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
. the economy is getting worse. but the fed is all in. they're at 85 a month. now, maybe some people like jim bulllard are talking about doing more, but that's not on the fed's table right now. what's on their table is potentially tapering out of the 85 a month when the market wants more. the market is stuck. they want more from the fed, because the economy is weakening, or they want the economy to rebound and nothing's happening and we jump around all over the place. >> warren, what do you think? you've been constructive on this market all through the first quarter. you felt like there was more to go here. but do you feel like the psychology is changing with the volatility that we've seen this week? >> i'll tell you, this week has been a little bit troubling, and i have been pretty bullish up until this point. when you tend to see days like this, where the day after day, up and down bid on the dow, 100-plus point move on any given day, that's a sign that this market is truly struggling. >> are you rethinking your bullish position, at least for the short-term? >> a little bit. i think the thi
. that is simply not good enough. it keeps the united states competitive and our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i traveled to germany. a cool tour ofng his butchery, he told me how things are done in germany compared to america. there are many specialis america. our apprenticeship system in germany is very dynamic. our workers are used in many areas of the work. my american friend was surprised to see the same staff sleeping and serving. and all the necessary things are learned in a three-year apprenticeship. this apprenticeship system serves as a worldwide example and should definitely be maintained. apprentices' ships? not good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is what i spoke to dr. orsino, headmaster of west mr. academy. what kind of challenge to educators face today? there's a time in which the mother, father, children would ents gto school andnts wlde they only have one parent or there are issues at all. they bring those challenges into the classroom. i think schools should help children love to learn, love to read, becom
will not be at jac jacn hole sim this year. my next guest said that we're seeing a slowdown in the economy after a stock first quarter, joining us, wells fargo chief economist, john sylvia, you see a slowdown here? >> there is a slowdown that is what bothered market, stock market a little bit, we a single family housing stocks, retail sales disappointing. building into the commodity market, chinese economic growth is disappointing. people at the inning of year think this economy will take off, and earnings will be strong, then as year goes down they tamper down those expectations. >> you know there is one stock that stands a metaphor, caterpillar, we see them with disappointining results off 42 their earnings, because they are off in the mining sector, but they tell us about good news, just the op ship of what said in -- opposite of what you said in china in their outlook. >> caterpillar is a true global business, they have a lot of infrastructure, a lot of mining and lot of development in many of the asian economies, looking at u.s. companies as traditional as manage mcdonald's and coca-ca ha
states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion of what is going on in america, i traveled to germany -- he told up with me how things were done in germany. there are many such special in america. our apprenticeship program in germany is very dynamic. wasmerican friends surprised to see the same staff sweeping and serving. things areessary learned in the three-year apprenticeship. it serves as a worldwide example and should be maintained. >> apprentice ships? not a good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is why i spoke to the headmaster of westminster academy. >> one of the challenge that educators face is the changing of the family. there was a time in which the mother, father, children would be a home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school in the only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they're bringing those challenges and to the classroom. what schools could should do it should help children love to learn, love to read, it becomes thinkers, become learners, become problem so
he told me about the challenges inherent in a unified european economy, part of the conversation this week. >> vastly different social security systems, pension systems, health care systems. if europe wants to move to more common funding of these systems is, which is one of the options at the end of the fiscal union, then they need to harmonize the systems before they move to a fiscal union. if you're talk:00 the common fiscal policy or a fiscal union, it's a decade or more off. >> we had in washington this week, what are your thoughts in terms of how the banks look in the next couple of years? are they going to be forced to sell assets and separate plain vanilla deposit businesses from investment bank, capital markets business? >> the issue is going to be going forward, even if you're well capitalized, can you resolve a bank, even a large bank if it runs into problems. and there i've seen some recent debates among the regulators, and the mood seems to have swung from having very sophisticated systems of separating these to simply say since it will be very difficult, let's just e
? >> my instinct tells me that the answer is no, that in economic terms i think the market, the economy at large will move beyond this relatively quickly. but at the same time, there may be some lingering impact in terms of investor sentiment. the sell-off clearly that occurred on friday and then again on monday, in my opinion, was a reassessment of the pace of global growth. important to point out that most of the weakness yesterday was already in the market before the bombings took place. but clearly, there is an impact on investor sentiment, a reminder that it's a dangerous world. and so you may see a little bit less of a risk appetite going forward. in economic terms, i think we'll move beyond it fairly quickly. >> yeah. john, i guess you would ask, at this point, you wouldn't think that consumers would change behavior based on this. it could potentially aveng -- i don't know, whatever group you want to talk about, jonathan, restaurants or any type of tourists activities. nothing to expect at this point, do you think? >> if you said to me are consumers going to be spending time watc
our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> somebody clearly framed them. i don't know who exactly but by framed them and then shot the boy dead. i can't reach anyone. i don't know about my children. i'm scared for my boy. they will shoot him dead, and then just say, he had weapons. where can he get weapons for god's sake? they're picking them up at rubbish dumps or what? i'm scared for my son, for his life. they should arrest him. bring him alive. alive. in the judicial system should investigate everything, who is right and who is guilty. >> neil: that's the father of dzhokar tsarnev, still missing out there, still anywhere. trying to find him. the older brother was killed last night in the shootout. we agree on the key legal point, being preferable to catch the brother alive. >> many reasons, you want him alive, want to talk with him, interrogate him, want to know who was he with, who supplied these things? you think about the two young terrorists out there, they couldn't -- it's very unlikely they did everything all of t
, boost the u.s. economy as supporters claim it will? lou dobbs is here. lori: let's update you on the markets as we do every 15 minutes, happening fast and furiously. we have the first check in this hour with nicole. what's the word on the floor among traders there, nicole? >> a couple things to note, obviously, we were selling off, back looking at what we looked at on monday, monday, we dropped 265 points, below even those levels. the vix, fear index, up 20% easily showing the nervousness in the market. selling across the board, particularly in economic sensitive areas like energy and technology, and apple, for example, below $400, and we'll is more on that throughout the show. the one thing to note is the volume is not as heavy like we saw on monday. there's less volume and less conviction to the selling; however, the selling is happening across the board. there's economically sensitive areas like financials bringing me to bank of america. reporting their quarterly numbers, look at bank of america. this weighing on the dow jones industrials, but more importantly, bank of amer
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
: thank you for coming on. dagen: government funding is a nonstarter, not a kick starter for the economy. that will not get in the way of the white house trying to spend more money speak that is true, dagen. people in a sense almost do not real. government spending went to this huge peak after tarp. over 25% of our economy. it has now fallen as a share of gdp. we are down close to 22% of gdp. it is still too big. government is actually falling as a share of gdp. first-quarter, the quarter that we just finished will get data for that in about a week. we are expecting about 3% growth. that is pretty good news from the economic front. dagen: is that already factored into this stock market? >> well, at least in the short term i think you are right. i believe the stock market itself is undervalued considerably. in other words, if you go back to early 2009, it is really the rise in profits that has driven this market. if we get any extension, what the investment community called multiples, the stock market could go even higher. the dow is worth it fair value 18,500. we have these pullbacks eve
-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is one of the seneca lake 12, a group of activists who last month blocked the gates of a natural gas storage facility in the beautiful finger lakes region of new york state. on a bitterly cold day in march, they were arrested as they demonstrated against the environmental dangers of fracking and the storing of natural gas in nearby abandoned salt mines. for now, new york has declared a moratorium that prohibits fracking in the state while studies are completed. but, there's no guarantee that gas obtained by fracking elsewhere won't be stored in those salt caverns. as you can see, for sandra steingraber, there is no line between he
despite the fact that these jobs are among the highest paying and the most stable jobs in our economy today. it is imperative that we encourage more young americans n.i.t. e studies in the fields. in particular because of the stark racial and gender gaps we see in the programs, it is imperative that we encourage more young women and students of color to enter these fields. we simply won't be able to remain a global leader in these mportant fields without more -- with more than 50% of our nation's brainpower sitting on the sidelines. h.r. 967 doesn't go as far as i would like it to go in addressing these challenges but it does show the need to educate more students in n.i.t. fields and provide the necessary authority for the agencies to pay an important and appropriate role here. and finally, i would be remiss not to mention that nitr-d program serves as a coordinating and planning umbrella for all unclassified federal cybersecurity r&d. our committee addressed specific needs in cybersecurity , r&d separately in h.r. 756 but in doing so, we made sure that both the intellectual and fina
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
on fixing it. immigration reform is vital to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let people crossing our borders who take away jobs. r oach ibanced. the border securitystro,ut achi. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz beacon has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.70 trillion a. we what this legi
. -- voyeurism. >> there will will certainly be taking a very close look. >> the world's emerging economy are saying german investment and bilateral trade. last week it was the indian leader here signing off and billions in deals. >> this tuesday, the ecuador president has been at the german capital. he is here for the 13th annual conference. the region is in the midst of a massive boom with german exports up by 39% last year alone. >> he is in germany for the first time. the president has high expectations of berlin and he is full of praise for his own country. >> ecuador is one of the most dynamic countries and latin america. the economy across latin america grew by 3.5% between 2007 and 2012. but in ecuador, it grew by 3.3%. >> the small, latin american country has not been very high on the german business sectors agenda until now. generally, interest in latin america has grown considerably recently. that is despite trade barriers in certain areas. german investment already amounts to 30 billion euros. >> they just the same difficulty as others. medium-sized companies today are ready t
into the future. they're estimating the pace of growth for economies around the world. joining us now from the business desk. good morning. what do they see? >> good morning. the results overall point to slower growth. those in japan suggest things are picking up. the international monetary fund has upgraded japan's economic outlook the next two years on expectations the country's bold monetary easing policy and weaker yen will help boost its economy. imf officials released the world's latest economic outlook and slowly downgraded the world economic forecast. and predict it will grow 1.6% this year, up .4 of a percentage point and they doubled the growth forecast next year to 1.4%. they expect the bank of japan's aggressive monetary easing to boost the growth rate. >> japan is forge iing a path o its own. it may have been more likely to call this a 3 1/2 recovery rather than a speed recovery. >> although the yen value has declined significantly in the recent past, the monetary policy followed by the boj is appropriate but at the same time, imf officials urge japan to work out a long term f
and the economy did not help the last 10 years to make that story any better. so with that, i want to just give a hearty thanks to maria's leadership for the last decade-and-a-half for putting together this project and her continued perseverance to make this happen. today we celebrate the sale of the land for the transbay transit tower. to the entrance transbay transit authority, for the first time i met mr. heinz, i can going to hang out with them more because i have heard a lot of stories between you that will help me run this city better. i will say that when this transit tower is complete, it will have the impact of transforming our city skyline with the tallest structure west of the mississippi and chicago. i'm about to leave for china tomorrow, and i get to go to china and tell them we've got the tallest building west of the mississippi, what about you? they are probably going to tell me they have tall buildings there as well but we at least have bragging rights. the state of the art, sustainable features, a plan, 1.4 million square foot office tower, developed, owned and operated by he
the state of the economy. other people are talking about technical reactions, but also the numbers from the usa are not as good anymore. bank of america reported results that have been far on next -- under expectations. >> we will stay in frankfurt for a closer look at the numbers. the dax -- it is down by more than 2.3%. the euro stoxx 50 is down by more than 2%. across the atlantic, things there are also down in negative territory. the euro is drifting lower against the greenback, trading at a value of 1.3044. >> the british retailer tesco, the world's third-largest, says it is pulling out of the u.s. market. profits fell for the first time in 20 years. >> empathy says it wants it wants to refocus on its british operations ash the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations -- the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations. >> millions of germans were disappointed today when they went to get their mail and, lo and behold, the letterboxes were empty. no holiday postcards from friends. that's because thousands of postal workers have gone on warning strik
weeks. >> the german economy is slowly awakening from its winter sleep. the country's leading economic research institutes have presented their spring forecast, saying they expect moderate growth of about 0.8% this year, but the think tanks are a bit more upbeat about 2014, where the forecast growth to reach about 2%, provided the current eurozone debt crisis does not spiral out of control. >> the economic outlook is bright. it is been booming bavaria. the state boasts near full employment. businesses like this are wide. it is an engineering firm. residential -- residents are up, order books full. it provides a snapshot of the wider german economy. one of the country's leading think tanks believes it will keep on growing because there are tentative signs europe is on the mend. >> these figures reflect the diminishing uncertainty and the fact the markets are now calmer. >> the think tank's forecast is much more optimistic than the german government policy official estimate, and ultimately, there will be exporters who decide who gets it right and who gets it wrong. >> onto thursday's mar
on the economy. people are eliminating chicken and duck from their diet. this is causing serious damage to the poultry industry. >>> city restaurants are losing a lot of money as many kmern vs. stopped ordering poultry fishes. orders have dropped off almost 50%. >> we're very concerned about the damage caused by unfounded rumors. it's a very serious situation for us. >> shoppers are also buying less poultry, both processed and unprocessed. so prices are falling. they're down by 20 to 30% since the first flu case was reported in beijing. and the price of eggs has also fallen by as much as 30%. >> translator: for the good of my health, i'm trying not to eat chicken. >> translator: i don't know how long this situation will last, but i'm really concerned. >> the spreading disease is having an impact on people's daily living. some are taking their own preventive measures. this man works for a company in beijing. he began washing his hands more often, and gargling every morning and evening. helies with his wife and daughter. among them, they keep more than 50 medical masks. >> translator: i a
and pursuing the comgo f overyears, fidelity investments, union bank, your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan. rethink and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments. turn here. >> bbc world news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by kcet, - hi, neighbor! today at school, we're choosing something new for the playground! swings or slide! they're both fun to play on! and then, we get to choose a new class pet! be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and he arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to sengthening america's future through education. adcasting
the winners or losers on april 29. >> finance ministers of the g-20 economies are softening their line on austerity. had a policy meeting in washington, d.c., they have agreed to set -- not to set hard targets. the discussions were dominated by talk of the struggling eurozone were harsh austerity measures have failed to lift the region out of its economic troubles. the german finance minister defended berlin's demands that the eurozone's troubled economies continue to cut spending. german shares fell for a sixth day in a row. their longest losing streak since november 2011, that amid disappointing earnings statements from some of the nation's largest companies. our correspondence sent us this summary from frankfurt. >> in the first quarter 2013, the software company has not been able to reach its goals, especially because of a far weaker than expected business in asia. sales have been far under estimates, and investors have been disappointed. they dragged down s&p shares by more than 2.5%, making them the leading loser -- >> saying the by a little early from frankfurt. let's take a clo
is taking its toll not only on the health of the people but also on the economy. as the virus spreads and concerns grow, people are eliminating chicken and duck from their diet. this is causing serious damage to the poultry industry. nhk world's michitaka yamaka reports from beijing. >> reporter: city restaurants are losing a lot of money as many customers have stopped ordering poultry dishes. it's enough to tempt wary diners. orders have dropped almost 50%. >> translator: we're very concerned about the damage caused by unfounded rumors. it's a very serious situation for us. >> reporter: food shoppers are also buying less poultry, both processed and unprocessed. so prices are falling. they are down by 20% to 30%. since the first case reported in beijing. the price of eggs has also fallen by as much as 30%. >> translator: for the good of my health, i'm trying not to eat chicken. >> translator: i don't know how long the situation's going to last, but i'm really concerned. >> reporter: the spreading disease is having an impact on people's daily living. some are taking their own preventiv
have got your's -- europe's third-biggest economy facing problems. what is the likelihood that things will get worse still? >> it is tangible tonight if you are standing outside the parliamentary building. there are thousands gathered in protest. ofs is a country in the grip a serious depression. this economy, 35% of people between the ages and -- of 15 and 25 are out of work. -- thereno indication is many people who feel the political parties are completely detached from the problems of those living there. >> thank you. keeping us up-to-date on the turmoil over the latest italian politics. we go to the u.s.. people in the city of boston are breathing a collective sigh of relief after the arrest of the second suspect in monday's boston marathon bombings. investigators are waiting to interrogate dzhokhar tsarnaev, who is lying seriously injured in a boston hospital. the 19-year-old and his brother are believed to have killed three and wounded more than 170 others. the police are trying to work out what exactly their motive was. >> the spectacular manhunt came to an end here. police sur
almost nothing but no. >> what is the biggest misconception about our economy? >> the deficit is the biggest problem we face. the deficit is not the biggest problem we face. the biggest problem is jobs and wages and getting back growth. >> for decades we have been told don't tax the upper class because the less tax they have the better it is for the middle class, true or false in. >> false. the idea that people at the top are the job creators belies -- the truth about the economy is the middle class they are the job creators because their spending creates jobs. >> so many people have been sold on this for years. >> i don't know why. trickle down economics. if you give more tax breaks to people at the top and companies at the top, you are going to create jobs has been proven over and over again to be false. >> amazing insight from robert rice. >> take a look at your hand. it's telling you something about your future. >> wheb you meet a ceo do you look at their fingers? >> i did. >> best selling author, bronson talks about the fascinatingfind. he talks about the length of your f
economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change fidelity can help you jafflet your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today the fidelity i.r.a. has a wagering of choices to fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> bbc world news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by hi, neighbor! we're playing farm today. neighhhh! and then, we're going to help clean up the playground! i love playing with you. and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. ghborh
to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault right up front. that is what we were looking for. nicole: for dollars four cents. yesterday, we broke below
. rather, we have the week numbers out of the chinese economy early last week. they are pretty much bearish on all of the commodities. they are saying that gold may turn around. connell: thank you, sandra. let's turn to brian jacobson a busy day in the markets overall. it is always good to have you on, brian. let me start with what sandra identified. the goldman sachs turn on gold. maybe we see the bottom. are they right about this? >> well, i do not think they are right about it. i do not view it as an investment. i view it as a spallation. i think a longer-term trend is for gold to be on the duke line. there are people calling for gold to go higher. short term, we could maybe see the european central bank ease a little bit more. eventually, that will come to an end. i do not think it is a trained eye would want to get on right now. connell: it could have some implications four other markets. for example, i have seen you writing about the fact we are riding a bull market for the u.s. dollar. >> exactly. i would expect if the dollar will strengthen over the longer-term, gold should week. th
showed more claims and that is not great news for the economy. i wanted to take a look two names on the dow jones industrials. one is the best performer and one is the big lagger. united health down 3.5% after their quarterly numbers, then you have verizon doing well with wireless particularly and in particular hitting highs we haven't seen in ten years. back to you. lori: thank you. global growth concerns bringing an end to the stock rally, the recent sell-off prompted the next guest to make the investor's portfolio, stifle nicklaus, portfolio manager has more on what is happening. thanks for joining us. we do follow you pretty closely and return to equity and commodity as you say, fundamentals are slowing. give us the best investment advice for where we go from here. >> to put it in context our group looks at a bunch of different economic variables. we saw a trough in the process last fall and added some exposure to equities as a result of improvement and fundamentals we saw under way right after the fed and the ecb took action last spring. as we rounded the corner and came int
is typically bought as a safe haven. expectations of a recovery in the global economy have prompted investors to buy riskier assets such as stocks. the latest chinese economic data has triggered further selling of gold. >>> japanese finance minister aso says he will seek the understanding of his group of 20 counterparts and central bank chiefs for the country's economic policy. leaders of the g-20 industrialized and developing nations are getting together in washington later this week. japan's economic policy may be a subject of discussion. u.s. treasury officials last week called on japan not to deliberately devalue its currency. >> translator: japan's measures including those of the bank of japan are aimed at ending prolonged deflation. i will, again, clarify this at the g-20 meeting. so there is no misunderstanding about how true policy objectives. >>> japanese entrepreneurs have had the chance to hear how to be successful from some of the best in the i.t. business. global tech leaders have urged them to expand their businesses with an open mind. executives of japanese i.t. firms organized
. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." "bbc world news america "reporting from washington. the white house says yesterday's bombing does not seem to be part of a broader plot. >> this was a heinous and cowardly act. given what we now know about what took place, the fbi is investigating it as an act of terrorism. >> but who did this and why is still a mystery. authorities are asking the public to hand in any photos or video recordings. amid tight security, london prepares for the funeral of
is the most important issue? is it the economy? or foreign affairs? what about health care programs? those are all very important issues but done to think if there is one central issue that can solve all our other problems, we should tackle it first? you may be thinking what should this be? it is simple. what then can give the kids the knowledge they need to solve all these other problems? it is education. if we can well-educate our current generation from toddlers to young adults and they have the tools they need to tackle all of these major problems -- >> public school education in this country has taken a back seat to other concerns. abelieve that hurts us as nation. one of the things that has made us so competitive throughout the years passed this the fact that we have had public school education, compulsory public school education. many countries do not invest in that. it is an investment in our future. >> we invest so much into the system but sometimes outcomes are not what we would like. american u.s.n educational system that is failing grossly. there's an issue of states' rights or
francisco, oakland, seattle and tacoma, come bind upon which the bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack which is the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it is easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column in a special edition of "time" on the tragedy in boston. let's get started. joining me now the man who runs the biggest police force in america and one of the country's best terror counterterror and intelligence division. ray kelly the commissioner of new york. >> good to be here. >> what do you have to tell us in the aftermath of this? is there a heightened sense of danger? are you seeing threats proliferate? >> no, we haven't seen an increase in threats, but our operating assumption is we are always at risk. we're a city
to boosting the economy and creating jobs, gop leaders have stuck to one solution. cut spending. >> it's time to cut spending. >> try and reduce the level of spending here in washington. >> our goal here is to cut spending. >> the sequester, it does cut spendi ing spending. >> cut spending. oh, sure, that'll fix everything, right? wrong. president obama repeatedly warned that last month's automatic budget cuts would hurt our economy and slow down our recovery. >> my budget also replaces the foolish across the board spending cuts that are already hurting our economy. >> but speaker boehner, majority leader cantor, and the other far right wingers wouldn't budge. and now the cuts are hurting air travelers. the faa has been forced to slash hours for 47,000 employees. including 15,000 air traffic controllers. and we're seeing airport delays all across the country. surely boehner and cantor are -- would be flying high. after all, they got those spending cuts they wanted to badly, didn't they? not quite. instead, they're still on the attack against the president. pushing the twitter hashtag obama fl
of the global economy. we saw russia come out last night. they warn that if the physical commodities continued a sell-off they may fall and slick themselves into a recession. if we start to see russia fall into recession, parts of europe also may fall. the u.s. to be right behind it, and this could be as serious meltdown that could occur. liz: well, a meltdown in gold. right now we're up about $4. it is not a big deal. still, well off of the eyes of the past year or so. let me just get to crude oil right now. it is rebounding a bit by about a dollar and 54. overall, the entire energy complex looks stronger. what is that duty today? >> i think we have overdone it. we oversold the market. we got into a level where commercial buyers came into start hedging positions. i'm with that. to me right now eyeleted 84 and a half to 85. from here you buy this. and we head back up higher. liz: what would drive the move fire? >> well, a couple of things. coming up with a lot of bad news right now. and there was a huge sell-off in commodities. it's it's a sex sweating over. bad economic news, the world econom
. for the travel industry, a key driver of the economy, we cannot afford to sit here and have congress pointing the finger at the administration, the administration putting the figure of congress. travelers are stuck in the airport. travel in this decrease over 7 billion jobs and supports those jobs each year. we cannot afford to be delayed in the airport. gerri: it does make a very big difference to our viewers. what you to respond to what the white house was saying today about this issue. listen to this. >> the faa, like other agencies, is personnel have the and in the end you cannot avoid when 70 percent of your budget of your operating budget is personnel you cannot avoid when the cuts are as deep as they are and the sequester, the kind of actions that are taken, these furloughs. that is the unfortunate fact of arbitrary across the board cuts like this. gerri: mike, you know, i want you to respond to that and also this, the faa knew the -- fa new these cuts were coming. what have they been doing? is some of this intentional? is some of this self-inflicted, what is going out? >> it is all in
go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur ♪ neil: we are live right now, engaging. how things are going in japan. last night at this time the market was clearing those losses as the night ensued. we were coming to you live. seeinghe market averages. most of the march to the upside. our own futures were flat to down. flat to slightly up prior to the news of a u.s. senator reports that he as a letter that tested positive. the letter never reached the senator we might point out. but it was wrote to him, and that is where they stopped it at a postal center in maryland. it does raise those eerie parallels to 9/11. he knows that better than the former new york stock exchange chairman and ceo who joins me right now on the phone. yuri parallels a night. totally
and when your biggest trading partner has a no-growth philosophy and paralyzing its own economy, you are not doing a lot of business with a partner, and the proximate cause for the weakness here in the united states was the shellacking in gold and the worst decline since 1980, and what we look at the etf falling 8% in a single day and now gold futures tumbling 15% in two days, and that is remarkable. and what caused that go down hideously? and gold and wheat causing all of the commodities to plummet, and oil did drop a little bit more than $2 after being down badly last week, i could say, yes, to that. i could say, yes, gold is that powerful and crush all sorts of assets in the declining wake, but it isn't. i could easily tell you, of course, that the slowing in china caused gold, copper, aluminum and other stocks the decline. it didn't. it would be an excuse that would fit the picture, but mystify you even more and really be nothing more than attempt by me to put the irrational in the rational box and then wrap a bow on it. think about it. china is terrible all year and nothing new
and granger. that's a great tell of the real economy. boy, it's hard not to -- >> there's a lot going on regarding housing. we'll keep our eyes on the homebuilders. >> these people want to try to find a hole in the housing starts, good luck. this is a very big move and we're building far fewer homes than what are destroyed by fire and flood. a lot of people will live with their mother-in-laws. >> despite what we know about the price of building products, right? and the cost of contractors and electricians. >> and i think some of those costs again will come down. copper came down big, and aluminum bid. we'll take you to boston. we're expecting this to be the fbi in charge of the boston field office and deval patrick there and the u.s. attorney carmen ortiz. let's listen in. >> everyone, thank you for coming this morning. less than 24 hours after yesterday's act of terror we wanted to organize a briefing for you with the information that we have. the mayor is here, the members of our congressional delegation, all of the law enforcement leadership. we have several people who want to pres
economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity no-fee ira. and "multiple choice," come to walgreens for help finding the one that's right for you... like centrum. now, get four dollars off select centrum products with balance rewards card. at the corner of happy and healthy. for over 30 years. and it's now the most doctor recommended, the most preferred and the most studied. so when it comes to getting the most out of your multivitamin, the choice is clear. centrum. on my feet and exactly where i needed more support. then, i got my number. my tired, achy feet affected my whole life. until i found my number. i tried the free dr. scholl's foot mapping center. in two minutes, i got my foot map and custom number. i'm a 440. that matched up to the dr. scholl's custom fit orthotic inserts with the right support and
to reduce the deficit in a balanced way, a way that doesn't punish the american people and our economy in the meantime. legislation that i'm proposing is simple. and it deserves quick approval. -- no reason to go back even though i would agree to it, let's -- to the buffett rule, let's do some spending cuts, do some more cutting, we've tried that. it wouldn't work. let's try the flexibility. that also won't work because you're dealing with the same amount of money. so i would hope that this simple solution i'm suggesting will be supported by my republican friends. establishing binding caps on war spending. the wars are winding down for certain. right now there's $650 billion there. and as this bill proposes, the one i will ask consent on, it will close that loophole and produce more than enough savings to offset the cost of delaying sequestration for five months. let's put a stop to the furloughs and delays that put a stop to the job losses. let's put a stop to the devastating cuts to programs that keep our poor children from getting an equal shot in life, our senior citizens, our home
monetary fund now predicts the global economy will grow by 3.3% this year, down 0.2 of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while eurozone economies will swing slightly. >>> car ownership comes with its own expenses, and it's a lot more than you probably realize. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain you over a thousand when you factor in gas, main tense, and tires. that cost is up about 2% from last year mostly because of an 11% surge in maintenance costs. anne-marie? >> erica ferrari here in new york. thanks, erica. >>> straight ahead, your morning weather. plus, in sports, the voice of the nfl goes silent. we will remember legendary broadcaster pat summerall. legendary broadcaster pat summerall. want to give your family more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be
to passing a bill to help states collect sales tax. >> you know it is ironic one area of our economy that is growing great, has you know great innovation, and just really revolutionized things, is one area that government has not touched that is the internet, specifically internet retailing, now they want to get their happeneds into that. it is horrible. the customer is going to get hurt, and damage the small internet retailers, onc once ag, once government starting meddling is goes kaput. neil: you know they all have a advantage that we don't have that our customers may this tax. they don't. and it is an unfair playing field? >> you know here is the bottom line, if a motivated buyer goes on-line to buy something to get a surprise tax, when they press pay. they -- that may cause them to not baez. thebuy, they have heard earned money, they budgeted. the bottom line is this could seriously hurt the economy but also cause people to second guess do i really need it right now, which is not what the economy needs, there are a couple of unintended consequences. this may cause retailer to ra
very quickly because the economy can't continue the way it is among other things giving gasoline away. they can't go on that way. >> nick raised the question of ideology. it's important to note that the opposition it wasn't an election about ideology. the opposition, what was fascinating about it is it ran on a comain to administer it more efficiently. they accepted the social missions. they accepted even the foreign policy. dressed in red. he was in some ways praising chavez and saying that maduro wasn't worthy. he see it wasn't an election about ideology but an election about continuing the goals. it's been remarkable. the way to think about it is to step back and really consider that this remarkable experiment in social democracy that we've seen more in south america than central america and mexico but a little bit in central america since for the last 10, 15 years beginning in some waysith chavez's election is outlasting. it's first-generation of leaders. lula went through his two terms. >> charlie: many people say he was a champion of the people who chavez thought he was the cham
's almost always because of fears about a steep slow down in the economy. now, it's the global economy. yeah, the worries used to be the united states centric. and perhaps the economy had been growing too hot. and the fed was raising rates. perhaps the monthly employment numbers showed a sudden reduction as we saw in the late summer of 2007, which ushered in the great recession. maybe there is a shocking shutdown in retail sales. now, i'm not saying that every single selloff plays out like this, but the vast majority of them actually really do. of course, lately we have a new element. we are all one world these days and a slow down in china is now greeted as more of a threat to our stock market than an actually slow down here in the united states. crazy. but it's true. when you get these kind of jitters, which include the requisite collapse in commodities like oil and copper and the markets sell, sell, sell, can't be combatted overnight because it's so horrendous, it does kind of paralyze things. but here's what happens. certain sectors stabilize a lot faster than others. particularly if the
for a whole host of reasons and the benefits that reform will provide to our country, to our economy, to our security. and we agree with those coauthors of the legislation in the senate who have made the point in recent days that enhancing our security is one of the reasons why we should press forward with comprehensive immigration reform. speculation about this particular matter is fine, but this is under investigation. the fact is that comprehensive immigration reform, as anybody who has looked into it and can attest, would enhance our security for all the reasons that i talked about at the top. >> okay. -- i'll ask about the faa graham says he disagrees with the obama administration's decision not to prosecute the suspect as an enemy combat it. >> i understand we will have a moment of silence for the victims in boston. that is appropriate, and the president is right to lead that effort. quickly, to the families who have lost loved ones, to those breaks as a nation. to the people of boston, you make us proud by the courage you have shown. to the law enforcement officials and intelligence c
-blooming self-starters. it's the latest chapter in his look at older workers in the american economy and all part of his on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> look at this nice, tight stomach with the abs which you could grate cheese on. >> reporter: at 55, judi henderson-townsend is working with a much younger crowd. >> it's like living in the land of dorian gray here. nobody ever ages. >> reporter: after a career spent working with stiffs in the corporate world, says townsend, she started mannequin madness. >> i sell mannequins, i rent mannequins, i repair mannequins, i blog about mannequins. here in our warehouse, we recycle them for the stores for free and then we resell them or rent them to other people. >> reporter: so you mean all those good looking folk back there were going to be dumped. >> those were going to be tossed into the landfill because the store didn't need them anymore. they're just maybe a few years old, but structurally nothing is wrong with them. it's like having a pre-owned lexus. >> reporter: townsend thinks she's modeling a trend: the rise of the m
in the economy spook you a little bit? >> you know, there's always those kinds of concerns out there, but let's think back at the whole first quarter. we've been looking for a selloff, and all the pros have been saying a selloff's coming, a selloff's coming. one never came. so monday was different. you could tell the trading monday, it broke through levels it hadn't, you know, previously broke through. this was real selling. and so this is the first opportunity, i believe, to kind of start looking for stocks on sale. i'm not saying jump in, you know, both feet, but, you know, we've been looking for stocks that are on sale, and you're finally getting them this week. and so we'll be using the continued weakness that i think will continue for a few more weeks to be buying stocks. liz: okay. microsoft numbers are out, and as we put up the stock reaction and, again, right now the stock is moving higher in the aftermarket session. we're waiting on the actual details of this, but as you can see, slightly higher in the aftermarket at the appointment as we pick apart the numbers, mac. your thought on
know you're aware that six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world are located in sub-saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nation. you should know that we have a bipartisan bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i would like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the drc? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cut to usaid hiv/aids funding? >> thank you very much, congresswoman. let me emphasize first of all that we were really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin, in the mountains watching of the program is being effectively adminis
.s. economy is headed south. lots of negative indicators recently, what do you say? >> i think that the u.s. economy is already in the south. if you will, and we don't show many signs of coming back, because of very bad policies coming out of washington. i mean, these things should be-- we should be lowering tax rates and broadening the tax base and controlling spending where it should be controlled and having free trade, minimal regulations, but we're going in the wrong direction, stuart. i think you're right. >> what about that question about everybody printing money? well, they are, we know that, but, i don't think it's working this time around. it's just not, you know, juicing the stock market like it used to. >> i don't think it used to so i agree with you totally. you can't push on a string and they have been trying to push on a string and if you look at it this is the single worst u.s. recovery in history and obviously, it's the largest single monetary expansion in history. and obviously, they don't work, they just don't work and he's grasping at straws and god knows what type of r
impact on how you look at the economy right now? are are you focused on other factors? >> at this point* i don't see them has any impact it is the actions going forward but it will not have an economic impact worries about people not wanting to go to a large sporting event and fortunately we have had these kinds of episodes before an economic impact has been negligent with so one of the event. but at this point* we did see an increase with the weekly consumer confidence numbers we get out from one survey. quite honestly it is said difficult and challenging period of time. i again, i step back but we are selling back into a realization it is a tough month for the economy. connell: to that point* to get away with the leading economic indicators came in looking at the dow and the generations the leading indicators declined does that tell you anything what was the message of that? >> of course, it doesn't tell us anything we don't know but it is amazing that shift in sentiment people have in the marketplace about the economy with the last four or eight weeks with the turn of the year and th
, and in a fairly weak economy since then did that says people about you hard correspondence they receive from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they are resisting the idea of going totally digital. we have heard anecdotally a lot of people that did do that and either missed a payment and they have said start those bills back up again. do not write the obituary for first-class mail. it delivers a lot of value for the sender and receiver, and it accounts for $28 billion worth of revenue for the postal service today, and i guarantee it will be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up more than 14% over last year's. we have created much of a credit by innovating and marketing new offerings, and we are benefiting from the big rise in e-commerce. andway people use the mail deliver service is changing it and is an exciting, and these changes will create opportunities for growth for the postal service and drop the entire mailing industry. the postal service is a tremendous organization, with the exceptio
but if we meet in the middle we can do a lot of good for americans and for our economy. we are feeling very good about this, things are moving in a very good way and the supported -- the president supported our proposal it is in the right place to be because even if people don't agree with every single part i don't want to give you the impression he is begrudging but he is enthusiastic. and we are playing it just right moving forward by giving us the space to come up with the agreement and we thank him for doing that and he will continue to do that to get a bill done. >> we briefed the president on a number of details and a proposal that gang of 8 is coming up with that we will be bringing forward to the united states senate as short of a time as this evening. but the process we went through having been in the senate to have this process before was very supportive. the president realizes everybody didn't want -- get what they wanted completely but it is a product of compromise we appreciate his support and we believe that is important as we move forward with the process. that this is the be
and a reminder that the government is a net drag on this u.s. economy. >>> check out auto nation. there is no better gainer on the s&p. stock that's already up 17% this year. >> it's remarkable. >> we all know what pent-up demand is for cars. we all know the mileage that's on the average trade-in. >> i like mike jackson. when you contrast europe with the united states, think of auto nation. okay? they can't move a car in europe. they can't move one across the street. >> you're absolutely right. talk about a dichotomy. >> we are not one world. used cars going up, too? the country you can get, wells fargo largest auto loan company. you can get money for a car. it is tougher to get money. richard smith, i have this guy from realogy. a large real estate company. they're holding their value much more than you thought in the united states. >> morgan stanley is down 3%. talked about m and a, lack of activity saying it just reflects the ceo's lack of confidence with regards to earnings power. >> which is what you hear. those who are doing deals, it is interesting, are the likes of -- or
strong human rights prevail are countries where people do better. economies thrive, rule of law are stronger, governments are more effective and they are countries that leade wod stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't just an indicator that a country is doing well, it unleashes a country's potential and helps to advance growth and progress. i ask you to think of a country like berma for a minute. cause of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reach wrd we want it to be? no but it is on the road and it is moving. more people are participating it ding to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the bermese government is opening their doors and developing stronger partnerships around the world. many challenges remain, corruption has to be rooted out. political prisoners need to be freed. horrible mob violence is another stressing reminder on how long it takes to build what is called the habits of the
of our economy, that is online businesses that are selling to the nation where we have seen tremendous growth, that we owe it to the american people to have this go through regular order. and you know, i have heard the senate leader talk about regular order. i have heard the minority leader, senator mcconnell, talk about regular order, and here we are again not going through regular order. this should go to the finance committee. it should be thoroughly marked up in that committee. and i see senator hatch here. senator baucus and senator hatch both believe that this should go through the proper committee of jurisdiction so that we can address the concerns raised by so many about the bill and the way it is drafted. so with that, mr. president, i would urge my colleagues to vote against closure. this is not the right way to do business. this bill that has very important and negative implications on many businesses in this country and on a very important area of our economy should go through regular order to address concerns that have already been raised by many business groups, and so, m
, beat or miss estimates? as for the economy, here is today's calendar. >> how is the crowd sourcing experiment gone so far? i haven't looked at the results. >> the results for coming. >>? >> i can't even log in to the borrowing page. >> they've gotten some decent numbers that have come this. i think there are 1500 or 1700 -- >> but are they better -- >> they're good at it, but i think we have made the mistake of picking from predictable companies. that's why we started picking some trickier companies like apple. that's the one that's up in the air. nobody knows exactly what's going to happen. if you can beat on these companies, then we're going to be more impressed. >> apple generates a lot of attention and feedback. if i put out on twitter, will apple meet, beat or miss, some people will say it will meet, some will say it will miss and others will stay you stink, sullivan. >> but you will get responses by putting apple out there. >> anything you say on apple, and i'm an apple lifelong user, and i referenced a couple weeks ago that i was going to buy a windows 8 machine because it w
. i know lgt runs some money that's invested into the russian economy. tell us a little bit about the character of this market and whether you can put cash to work here and feel comfortable that you are going to get a return. >> yep. we are invested in the russian market. but it's true, we have a lower allocation to it. the 11% toe 2% sounds quite low. it is a difficult way to access the markets. we see fundamentally from the point of view a strong currency. you look at low valuation, you look at the current surplus, you look at growing middle income class, which wants to consume, so key market indicators are actually strong. the challenge is much more the investment type. so we look at a narrow market, the way you invest is mainly into oil and energy companies. which most of them are state owned to the majority, so we end up being minority investors. what that means is it's still difficult for to us play to the russian growth topic investmentwise. what we can do is we can look at valuation, we can look at it from an optimal point of view. we can see if there is opportunities whic
Search Results 55 to 154 of about 507 (some duplicates have been removed)